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Visual Impairment :
Special Educational Needs

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EHCP ANALYSIS SCHEDULE
SECTION E

The outcome sought for the child or young person

In statements of Special Education Need the first section of Part 3 included a set of objectives. These were often not specifically focused on the pupil and were often vague and aspirational, e.g. to provide access to the curriculum taking into account the effects of visual impairment. In an EHCP the outcome differs from an objective. The SEN COP explains what is intended in paragraph 9.66

 

An outcome can be defined as the benefit or difference made to an individual as a result of an intervention. It should be personal and not expressed from a service perspective; it should be something that those involved have control and influence over, and while it does not always have to be formal or accredited, it should be specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time bound (SMART).

 

For every identified need in section B, C and D there must be corresponding outcomes in Section E

List of needs
identified in
sections B,C and D
Red arrow image
Outcomes
described
in section E

 

 

Check all of the outcomes. Are all aspects of the needs identified in Sections B, C and D represented be outcomes in this section ?

Are the outcomes SMART ? They should be specific, i.e. clear and unambiguous, have an aspect which is measurable, be achievable by the pupil, given his/her condition, abilities and needs, realistic and there should be a specified time span, e.g. be the end of year 6, by the end of key stage 2.

Some outcomes are written as "on-going". Look at these carefully. Can they be written in a more specific and time-related way ? These are examples of curriculum access outcomes for a severely visually impaired pupil starting in secondary school :

By the end of key stage 3 Barney will have accessed the full curriculum, on a par with his sighted peers, using differentiated and modified resources and work that is meaningful to him.

By the end of key stage 3 he will achieve National Curriculum levels in all subjects that are consistent with his age and ability.

 
             

If the outcomes in the EHCP are not SMART then you can object to a specific outcome proposing an amendment which is SMART, or object to all of them requesting that the LA redrafts all of them in line with the statutory requirements.

A request for a specific amendment, showing the original deleted (not SMART) text and the parents' SMART amendment :

Barney will have social interaction and social skills so that he can interact and play with his peers.

By the end of year 7 Barney will have accessed all of the extra-curricular activities, sports and opportunities that he chooses.

An example of a complaint/request letter :

 

SECTION E

Section E is inadequate as the outcomes fail to meet the requirements of the SEN Code of Practice (2014). They should not be drafted as if they were objectives in a statement of special educational need and should be redrafted using the guidance in the SEN Code of Practice. We have serious concerns about these outcomes.

In the SEN Code of Practice, Paragraph 9.66 states :

An outcome can be defined as the benefit or difference made to an individual as a result of an intervention. It should be personal and not expressed from a service perspective; it should be something that those involved have control and influence over, and while it does not always have to be formal or accredited, it should be specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time bound (SMART). When an outcome is focused on education or training, it will describe what the expected benefit will be to the individual as a result of the educational or training intervention provided. Outcomes are not a description of the service being provided – for example the provision of three hours of speech and language therapy is not an outcome. In this case, the outcome is what it is intended that the speech and language therapy will help the individual to do that they cannot do now and by when this will be achieved.

SMART comes from the November 1981 issue of Management Review which contained a paper by George T. Doran called There's a S.M.A.R.T. way to write management's goals and objectives

Specific – The criterion stresses the need for a specific outcome rather than a more general one. This means the goal is clear and unambiguous.

Measurable – quantify or at least suggest an indicator of progress. A measurable outcome will usually answer questions such as: How much? How many? How will I know when it is accomplished? Indicators should be quantifiable

Achievable – outcomes should be appropriate to the child/young person and within his/her capabilities.

Realistic – state what results can realistically be achieved, given available resources.

Time-related – specify when the result(s) can be achieved.

These outcomes are not SMART. They must be redrafted to that they meet the statutory requirements.

The outcomes should match the special educational needs described in Section B, so for every special educational need there should be an equivalent outcome in Section E and there should also be related provision in Section F.









     
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